nightbird: Mucha illustration, young peasant holding scythe and grain (and she was)
Quietly imagine that I have been posting and/or writing this month.

So, more and more things fall into place. I've been using Trio Medieval's sacred recordings as my basis for the Quiet Sisters up to now, but while I was home for Christmas, I snagged their album of Norwegian folk songs. The only instruments other than their voices are percussive. This is what witches sound like.
Mood:: 'enthralled' enthralled
Music:: "Tjovane," Trio Medieval
nightbird: Mucha illustration, young peasant holding scythe and grain (the fox confessor)
Project: Write the story that accompanies this soundtrack.

1) "Come Home," Kris Delmhorst (You left here on your dirty feet but you're gonna come home on the train)
2) "Doubletree," Jeffrey Foucault (That morning came up shining clear and sharp as broken glass)
3) "Maybe Sparrow," Neko Case (Notes are hung so effortless with the rise and fall of sparrow's breast)
4) "Muddy Meadow," Calexico (Instrumental, 0:54)
5) "End of Amnesia," M. Ward (Instrumental, 2:12)
6) "Iowa (Traveling III)," Dar Williams (But for you I came this far across the tracks, ten miles above the limit and with no seatbelt)
7) "Cinder and Smoke," Iron & Wine (Give me your hand and take what you will tonight)
8) "The Song They Were Singing When Rome Fell," Anais Mitchell (No evening news, just our bodies and a record playing Delta blues)
9) "The Pharaohs," Neko Case (You kept me wanting wanting wanting like the wanting in the movies and the hymns)
10) "John the Revelator," Son House (Mary, Margaret, they were there and heard every word he said)
11) "Homeward These Shoes," Iron & Wine (Homeward with heaven above me, old road behind me, a door up ahead)
nightbird: Mucha illustration, young peasant holding scythe and grain (the fox confessor)
posted by [personal profile] nightbird at 05:19pm on 11/07/2009 under ,
Lhasa de Sela made The Living Road in 2003. Above and beyond being an absolutely incredible album, it contains two songs that are absolutely key to The Falling Woman, which used to be called The Soft Road. The most important was "Anywhere On This Road." Lyrics and sound behind the cut. )

Anyway, I just found out that Lhasa has finally, finally released a new album, Rising. Apparently it's all in English (I do love her French and Spanish songs, though; I'll miss them), and has its fair share of bluegrass and (North) American roots influences, according to the reviews on iTunes (link opens in iTunes Store).

So yes, I'm quite excited about getting my hands on this.

Links

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